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Netherlands: First Country to legalize same-sex marriage


Author: Vaibhav Goyal

Designation: Student, University Institute Of Legal Studies, Panjab University

Email: goyal999@outlook.com


NETHERLANDS: FIRST COUNTRY TO LEGALISE SAME-SEX MARRIAGE

"Same-sex marriage isn't a gay privilege, it's equal rights. Privilege would be something like gay people not paying taxes. Like churches don't."

-Ricky Gervais

A goliath inflatable pink cake decorated with rainbow-blazed candles cleared its path through Amsterdam's canals on April 01, 2021, as the nation commended its long 20 years of the journey since it came the first nation in 2001 to legitimize same-sex marriage, a step which was followed by 29 more nations after that. "There are two motivations to rejoice, ″ Mayor Job Cohen told the couples before pink champagne and pink cake were served. ″You are commending your marriage, and you are additionally praising your entitlement to be married. ″


Amsterdam additionally celebrated by flying an immense rainbow banner from the ringer pinnacle of the milestone Western Church, close to the Anne Frank House historical center. Afterward, the city held an online conference and is assigned a "rainbow walk" course along 20 destinations considered significant in the battle for LGBTQ rights.


Same-sex marriage is currently lawful in 28 nations around the world, just as oneself administering the island of Taiwan. That incorporates the greater part of Western Europe. However, its implementation is non-equal — Taiwan is the lone nation in Asia to make the stride; South Africa is the lone African nation to do as such. In numerous nations, even outside of Asia and Africa, resistance to marriage equity stays heartfelt.

In Guatemala, a few legislators have proposed a bill that would expressly boycott same-sex marriage. In Poland, President Andrzej Duda was elected again to power a year ago after his campaign portraying LGBTQ rights development as more destructive than socialism. Poland is among a strong coalition of Eastern European nations that have opposed same-sex marriage, while 16 nations in Western Europe have authorized it.


Switzerland is in a position to become the seventeenth — its parliament endorsed the authorization of same-sex marriage in December. But the law hasn't taken effect, and opponents are trying to collect enough signatures to require a referendum on whether to overturn it. Same-sex marriage is legitimate in the United States, Canada, and Costa Rica; five South American nations; a dominant part of Mexico's 32 states; Australia and New Zealand.

The individuals who took an interest thought back proudly at having made lawful history. "Individuals disclosed to me that the Netherlands would be the first and the last nation (to pass same-sex marriages), the world will not follow you," said Henk Krol, a legislator who upheld the bill when it passed the Dutch parliament in 2000. "Right around 30 nations in the world followed the Dutch model," he said.

"If you had told me 20 years ago that today same-sex marriage would be a reality in 29 countries, I would not have trusted you,"

said Jessica Stern, executive director of the global LGBTQ-rights group OutRight Action International. However, she noticed how enraptured the world is in regards to LGBTQ acknowledgment, with almost 70 nations proceeding to condemn same-sex relations. "The advancement has been incredible, no uncertainty. However, we have a lengthy, difficult journey ahead," Stern said.

A few nations in Europe — including Italy, Greece, and the Czech Republic — give civil unions to same-sex couples. Yet, regardless of whether these plans offer large numbers of the securities of marriage, numerous LGBTQ activists think of them as a disparaging second-level status. In the Netherlands, there have been more than 18,000 same-sex marriages since 2001 — around 53% of them between two women, as per the Dutch Central Bureau of Statistics. Every year around 400 same-sex marriages separate, the authority says.


As opposed to the Netherlands, there was an 11-year gap in the United States between the principal lawful same-sex marriages in Massachusetts in 2004 and the 2015 Supreme Court deciding that all-encompassing legitimization from one side of the country to the other. As indicated by the Williams Institute, a research organization at the UCLA School of Law that has some expertise in research on LGBTQ issues, there were 513,000 hitched same-sex couples in the US in 2020.


As in different nations legitimizing same-sex marriage, well-known help for the idea has risen consistently in the US since 2004. In those days, 42% of Americans figured same-sex marriage ought to be sanctioned, as indicated by the Gallup Poll. By a year ago that figure had arrived at 67%. In Africa, where strict and social practices regularly dislike homosexuality, no nation shows up on target to before long join South Africa in authorizing same-sex marriage.


India struck down a colonial period law in 2018 that made gay sex punishable by up to 10 years in prison, and there are some openly gay celebrities. But same-sex marriage remains illegal; the government says gay and lesbian couples don't warrant the status of "family unit."


References:

1. Mike Corder, 20 years of marriage equality: the Netherlands celebrates landmark anniversary, Los Angeles Times, April 01, 2021

2. David Crary and Mike Corder, Two decades since the world’s first legal same-sex marriages, where do we stand now? First Post, April 03, 2021

3. Maggie Baska, The Netherlands celebrates 20 years since becoming the first country to legalise same-sex marriage, Yahoo News, April 01, 2021

4. Claire Felter and Danielle Renwick, Same-Sex Marriage: Global Comparisons, Council on Foreign Relations, June 23, 2020

5. Jana Vondráčková, 20 years ago today, the Netherlands became the first country to legalize same-sex marriage, Dutch Review, April 1, 2021




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#Netherlands

#LGBTQ

#Rightsforall

#Equalityforall

#MarriageEquality

#Legalsamesexmarriage

#rainbowwalk